о русской музыки и кино 9

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last posted Aug. 11, 2017, 12:25 p.m.
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Is this "Ecstasy" or Ex-Stas-y?

In either case (unless I've horribly misunderstood the plot) the moral from 7:40-9:30 would seem to be "not having any culture may be overlooked, but not having a current passport is simply an own goal"?

Previous Leningrad cards: A, B, C.

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«Салам Алейкум» или «Шолом Алэйхем»?

Either way, we're covered, whether we want a clip with the jewish interpretation as set in last century's shtetls:

or we want a clip with the muslim interpretation as performed by this century's university students:

... and as the phrase is a greeting in both cultures, we can even compare it to the —very 1980's— atheist commie music video «Алло»:

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a little ditty about driving to the next village over (itself, in material culture, reminiscent of life in pre-war alpine villages, except here the village dances were called "balls", not "discos") which has inspired a few pastiches, including the very professional (it turns out to be excerpts from a feature film) Armenian version:

as well as the amusingly amateur:

(good thing for the US OSHA that it need not bear any responsibility for agricultural safety practices among kids in the neighborhood of Borodino)

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Women as protagonists are easy to find in the context of this stream.

In the following scene, Alisa Selezneva impresses her new class by having a conversation with their teacher, Alla Sergeevna, about London:

(TV show based on a sci-fi series started in the mid-1960's)

The solist in the following song from "Hussar Ballad", Shura Azarov/Shurochka Azarova, is pretending to be a male cadet in order to fight the XIX french.

(movie based on the memoirs of a historical tomboy who served in the cavalry, published 1836)

Finally, "Miss Pavlichenko" may have a written biography somewhere, but I learned about her from a recent movie:

(and, it being the XX, she didn't have to pretend to be male)

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What a long strange trip it's been...

A 1980's Latvian song contest finalist:

had its tune taken, with the lyrics changed out for a different story, becoming not only a soviet hit when sung by Пугачева, but an evergreeen, even in translation*...

...among which, a persian translation performed (indoors, judging by the liberal amounts of greenscreen) by the Iranian singer Farzaneh ...

... then recently reprised in Tadjikistan by Фарангис: (NSFW if you're in a country where you shouldn't be watching grown women without hats in the office...)